Almost reunited

(Photo credit: iStock.com/siraanamwong)   //

This weekend just past, I missed a reunion.

I was by no means the only class member who didn’t show (in fact, about two thirds of the class didn’t make it), but it was nevertheless disappointing not being able to go.

Thoughts of “if only I were feeling better!” were replaced by “maybe it won’t be that great. Maybe I’m not really missing anything. I ought to just forget about it.”

In my heart, though, I knew it’d actually be good (and once again, I was missing out).

Most people have mixed feelings about reunions. On one hand, they might be looking forward to catching up with familiar faces again, while on the other, they might be a little nervous about… well, exactly that.

“What have you been up to lately?” and  “what are you doing now?” are all fair-game questions asked at reunions. They are great questions, if you can supply a great answer.

What if you can’t?

This is a dilemma, especially for any person suffering with a chronic illness. How do you tell your peers that nothing has really improved in the years since they last saw you? Indeed, how do you tell them that there’s no guarantee things will improve in the future, short of a miracle? You can be blunt, but that could be awkward, and puts the person asking the question in an uncomfortable position. How will they respond?

Choosing not to attend reunions brings with it a degree of relief. While there is the pain of being aware that you’re missing out, at least there will be no probing questions.

This time, I didn’t have that choice. In the midst of a ‘crash’, I was too unwell to go.

What about you? How do you feel about attending class reunions?

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